Talk:Lex Equitia Galeria de legibus ex post factis (Nova Roma)

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(Reply to Aurelius)
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Recommendation: Refer to Praetors to have it repealed by the Comitia.  --[[User:Decimus Aurelius Ingeniarius|Decimus Aurelius Ingeniarius]] 11:46, 19 October 2021 (CEST)
 
Recommendation: Refer to Praetors to have it repealed by the Comitia.  --[[User:Decimus Aurelius Ingeniarius|Decimus Aurelius Ingeniarius]] 11:46, 19 October 2021 (CEST)
  
::This was an amendment to the Constitution, all constitutional amendments merge to the Constitution. It is indeed in force, however, we differentiate between those laws that are in force on their own, and those which are amendments or modifications, which merge to the law which they modified. A non-constitutional amendment is "lapsed" by the moment it has modified the law it was meant to amend. Praetor P. Memmius, who created our current structure of the Tabularium and its style of annotation around {{2009}}, determined that a lex was called "lapsed" when it had filled its function, but constitutional amendments would be called "merged" instead of "lapsed" in the same situation. Technically, all such amendments are "in force" (unless overridden by later laws), it is only a matter of annotation that we define them as "lapsed" or "merged".  
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::'''LENTULUS''': This was an amendment to the Constitution, all constitutional amendments merge to the Constitution. It is indeed in force, however, we differentiate between those laws that are in force on their own, and those which are amendments or modifications, which merge to the law which they modified. A non-constitutional amendment is "lapsed" by the moment it has modified the law it was meant to amend. Praetor P. Memmius, who created our current structure of the Tabularium and its style of annotation around {{2009}}, determined that a lex was called "lapsed" when it had filled its function, but constitutional amendments would be called "merged" instead of "lapsed" in the same situation. Technically, all such amendments are "in force" (unless overridden by later laws), it is only a matter of annotation that we define them as "lapsed" or "merged".  
  
Regarding this particular lex, it is still in force in the lex Cornelia Domitia (Constitution). It was carried on from the previous Constitution, look at the listing of citizens' rights. But it really doesn't matter if the regulations in this lex Equitia Galeria are still active or not: this was an amendment, it amended the Equitian Constitution, it filled its life span by that (in as much as our annotation style, based on macronational practice, considers all modification leges lapsed after the modification is completed).
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:Regarding this particular lex, it is still in force in the lex Cornelia Domitia (Constitution). It was carried on from the previous Constitution, look at the listing of citizens' rights. But it really doesn't matter if the regulations in this lex Equitia Galeria are still active or not: this was an amendment, it amended the Equitian Constitution, it filled its life span by that (in as much as our annotation style, based on macronational practice, considers all modification leges lapsed after the modification is completed).
  
 
--[[User:Gnaeus Cornelius Lentulus|Gnaeus Cornelius Lentulus]] 19:27, 25 October 2021 (CEST)
 
--[[User:Gnaeus Cornelius Lentulus|Gnaeus Cornelius Lentulus]] 19:27, 25 October 2021 (CEST)

Revision as of 17:29, 25 October 2021

AURELIUS: The lex is stated as being 'merged with the constitution' on the List of all passed laws but it should otherwise still be considered active and 'In Force'. It is not written anywhere that it is repealed - expected to have been mentioned in Lex Lucilia de re publica restituenda (Nova Roma); but it is not mentioned.

Recommendation: Refer to Praetors to have it repealed by the Comitia. --Decimus Aurelius Ingeniarius 11:46, 19 October 2021 (CEST)

LENTULUS: This was an amendment to the Constitution, all constitutional amendments merge to the Constitution. It is indeed in force, however, we differentiate between those laws that are in force on their own, and those which are amendments or modifications, which merge to the law which they modified. A non-constitutional amendment is "lapsed" by the moment it has modified the law it was meant to amend. Praetor P. Memmius, who created our current structure of the Tabularium and its style of annotation around M. Curiatio M. Iulio cos. MMDCCLXII a.u.c., determined that a lex was called "lapsed" when it had filled its function, but constitutional amendments would be called "merged" instead of "lapsed" in the same situation. Technically, all such amendments are "in force" (unless overridden by later laws), it is only a matter of annotation that we define them as "lapsed" or "merged".
Regarding this particular lex, it is still in force in the lex Cornelia Domitia (Constitution). It was carried on from the previous Constitution, look at the listing of citizens' rights. But it really doesn't matter if the regulations in this lex Equitia Galeria are still active or not: this was an amendment, it amended the Equitian Constitution, it filled its life span by that (in as much as our annotation style, based on macronational practice, considers all modification leges lapsed after the modification is completed).

--Gnaeus Cornelius Lentulus 19:27, 25 October 2021 (CEST)

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