Ludi Romani 2767 a.u.c.

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| style="text-align:center; font-size:10pt;" | ''TUE Sep 9''
 
| style="text-align:center; font-size:10pt;" | ''TUE Sep 9''
 
| style="text-align:center; font-size:10pt;" | ''a.d. V Id. Sep.''
 
| style="text-align:center; font-size:10pt;" | ''a.d. V Id. Sep.''
| style="text-align:center; font-size:10pt;" | ''[http://novaroma.org/augustus/actium.html Online Naumachia]''  
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| style="text-align:center; font-size:10pt;" | ''[http://novaroma.org/augustus/actium.html Online Naumachia Game]''  
 
| style="text-align:center; font-size:10pt;" | ''[[Ludi Romani 2767 a.u.c./Certamen Historicum|Certamen Day 2 Questions]]''
 
| style="text-align:center; font-size:10pt;" | ''[[Ludi Romani 2767 a.u.c./Certamen Historicum|Certamen Day 2 Questions]]''
 
| style="text-align:center; font-size:10pt;" | ''''  
 
| style="text-align:center; font-size:10pt;" | ''''  
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| style="text-align:center; font-size:10pt;" | ''MON Sep 15''
 
| style="text-align:center; font-size:10pt;" | ''MON Sep 15''
 
| style="text-align:center; font-size:10pt;" | ''a.d. XVII Kal. Oct.''
 
| style="text-align:center; font-size:10pt;" | ''a.d. XVII Kal. Oct.''
| style="text-align:center; font-size:10pt;" | ''Online Chariot Racing''  
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| style="text-align:center; font-size:10pt;" | ''[http://novaroma.org/augustus/hippodrome-nr.html Online Chariot Racing Game]''  
 
| style="text-align:center; font-size:10pt;" | ''[[Ludi Romani 2767 a.u.c./Certamen Historicum|Certamen Day 5 Questions]]''
 
| style="text-align:center; font-size:10pt;" | ''[[Ludi Romani 2767 a.u.c./Certamen Historicum|Certamen Day 5 Questions]]''
 
| style="text-align:center; font-size:10pt;" | ''''  
 
| style="text-align:center; font-size:10pt;" | ''''  
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It is done!
 
It is done!
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==Prayer to Furrina==
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''prid. Id. Sep.''
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:'''Most Ancient One'''
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:'''Goddess of the Etruscans'''
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:'''Ruler of Janiculum Hill'''
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:'''Lady of the Sacred Grove'''
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:'''Guardian of the Forest'''
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:'''Goddess of Springs'''
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:'''Friend of the Nymphs'''
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:'''Mistress of the Flowing Fresh Waters'''
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:'''May You bless us with your beauty,'''
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:'''with your healing waters,'''
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:'''with your nourishing energy.'''
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:'''May good Fortune flow to us as Your'''
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:'''healing waters flow toward the sea.'''
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''As performed by''
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:MAN. TITINIVS SILVANVS
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:Flamen Furrinalis
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''The Flamen Furrinalis oversees the cult of Furrina, a Goddess of Springs who had a sacred grove associated with water (possibly connected with health and healing). The Flamen Furrinalis leads public rites on the days sacred to Furrina.''
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==CEREMONY TO THE DIVINE IUPPITER==
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SEP 13, 2014 (2767 AUC)
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For the Ludi Romani (Feriae Iovi / Idus Septembris)
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St. Cornelia C. Aemilio cos.
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Id. Sep.
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MMDCCLXVII a.u.c.
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Performed by:
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L. Vitellius Triarius, Pontifex
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Provincia America Transappalachiana
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Republic of Nova Roma
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Among the ancient Romans, Iuppiter was the supreme god of the Roman pantheon, called dies pater, "shining father". He is a god of light and sky, and protector of the state and its laws. He is a son of Saturn and brother of Neptune and Juno (who is also his wife). The Romans worshipped him especially as Iuppiter Optimus Maximus (all-good, all-powerful). This name refers not only to his rulership over the universe, but also to his function as the god of the state who distributes laws, controls the realm and makes his will known through oracles. His English name is Jove. He had a temple on the Capitoline, together with Juno and Minerva, but he was the most prominent of this Capitoline triad.
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His temple was not only the most important sanctuary in Rome; it was also the center of political life. Here official offerings were made, treaties were signed and wars were declared, and the triumphant generals of the Roman army came here to give their thanks. Other titles of Iuppiter include: Caelestis (heavenly), Lucetius (of the light), Totans (thunderer), Fulgurator (of the lightning). As Iuppiter Victor he led the Roman army to victory. Iuppiter is also the protector of the ancient league of Latin cities. His attribute is the lightning bolt and the eagle is both his symbol and his messenger. Iuppiter is completely identical with the Greek Zeus.
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September 13th is the Feriae Iovi, or Festival of Iuppiter.  It is also the Idus of September, being sacred to Iuppiter.  Therefore, on this Feriae Iovis and Idus, I arose early and performed the following public ceremony to Iuppiter Optimus Maximus in my home, and welcome and invite you to perform it in your own home, or at least the private ceremony which follows.
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===PUBLIC RITUS TO THE DIVINE IUPPITER===
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FERIAE IOVI / ID. SEP. 2767 AUC (2014 CE)
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''I washed both hands in clean water and, in capite velato, prayed:''
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'''Haec aqua a corpore impuritates velut'''
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'''plumbo ad aurum mutando eluat.'''
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'''Purga mentem.'''
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'''Purga carnem.'''
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'''Purga animum.'''
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'''Ita est!'''
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May this water cast out all impurities from my substance as from lead to gold.
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Purify my mind.
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Purify my body.
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Purify my heart.
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It is so.
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'''Dive Iove!'''
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'''Dive Iove!'''
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'''Dive Iove!'''
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Divine Iuppiter!
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Divine Iuppiter!
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Divine Iuppiter!
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'''Dive Iove,'''
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'''te hoc ture commovendo'''
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'''bonas preces precor,'''
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'''uti sis volens propitius'''
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'''Novis Romanis, amicis meis,'''
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'''mihi, domo, familiae!'''
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''I offered incense''
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Divine Iuppiter,
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by offering you this incense
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I pray good prayers so
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that you be benevolent and propitious
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to the Nova Romans, to my friends,
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to me, to my household and to my family.
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'''Dive Iove,'''
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'''ut te ture commovendo'''
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'''bonas preces precatus sum,'''
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'''eiusdem rei ergo'''
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'''macte vino inferio esto!'''
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''I offered wine''
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Divine Iuppiter,
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as by offering incense
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I have prayed good prayers,
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for the very same reason
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be thou blessed by this wine.
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'''Iuppiter omnipotens, omnia potens, in hac festivitate tibi'''
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'''Ad quem respicit, et admirans ad senem septentriones mirum,'''
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'''notum est, qui semper virtutibus in mille,'''
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'''et ideo nemo umquam vidit Aristoteles aut innumerabiles.'''
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'''Fiat autem si quo dirigantur nomen dignatio vestra,'''
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'''Sancti libenter, nescio, quem tremit fortissimus'''
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'''ipsorum commodo vaga sidera cursus.'''
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'''Tu solus, sed tu ipse in pluribus,'''
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'''Tu in principio, et tu solus, et similiter inter vos,'''
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'''et orta inter sidera ipsa superstes.'''
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'''Finis enim non tibi, ad finem adducere labentibus semper.'''
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'''Celsum, videre ab aeterno in sæculum rotatis'''
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'''quaedam de natura et fatum vitarum accipitur in impeditis et reuoluta'''
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'''a multis retro saeculis, iterum reduci modo'''
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'''firmamento redditi,'''
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'''deducto partium mundi et certe amissa restituit,'''
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'''tura plus semel in Time fluunt.'''
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'''Si sensus ordinare licet cogitare'''
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'''conatum tuum et ad te capere turmis'''
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'''quibus de immensa magnitudine stellarum et coronásti'''
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'''similitudinem tuam amplector, aethera,'''
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'''forte apparet imago tua in praesenti est momentaneum mico'''
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'''cum membra fluentia fulminis ignes,'''
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'''qui es in Caelum,'''
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'''Tu inferno illuminati'''
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'''curvo in lucem dies.'''
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'''Tu genus omne deum In.'''
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'''Confirmatioque omnium causa vos estis.'''
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'''Natura tu es, Domine, Deus infinita.'''
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'''Ut patet in multis ita factum est hic, ut aliquando a Deo'''
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'''hic semel nascitur in mundo in domum Dei et hominum,'''
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'''Lucent, ex regia stellantis in agro flos iuventae faciebat.'''
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'''Tua me immittere spirate quaeso'''
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'''volenti concedimus nosse, in qua pater, modo mundum.'''
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'''Da, pater Iove, augustas ut possim noscere causas, quibus venire'''
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'''Aliquando simul omnia sub forma materiae rebus,'''
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'''et quod lux textura,'''
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'''sed videantur quae de congruentia,'''
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'''Olim in ea pertexuit,'''
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'''qui mundum ab anima: tu,'''
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'''id est, quid sit, et vivam,'''
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'''per quod vivit corpus, est vivos.'''
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''I offered wine and incense''
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Iuppiter Almighty, potent in all things, during this festival to you,
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to Whom the aged north star looks upon with admiring wonder,
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the One who is always known by a thousand virtues,
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no one shall ever be able to account their countless number or timelessness.
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Now be addressed, if by any name Your dignity may be addressed,
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Holy One, be delighted, Unknown One, for Whom mightiest Earth trembles
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and the wandering stars halt their rapid course.
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You alone, though within Yourself are You many,
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You are first, and You are last, and likewise are You in between,
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arising above and outliving the very stars.
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For without end Yourself, You bring ever-gliding time to an end.
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On high from eternity You look upon the whirling course
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of Nature's certain Fate and of lives taken into the intricate convolutions
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of time immemorial, only to be brought back once more
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and restored to their heavenly vault,
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the world no doubt restored of those parts drawn off and will have been lost,
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only once more for them to ebb back into the flow of unending time.
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If indeed it is allowed to thoughtlessly direct one's senses
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toward You and attempt to grasp Your holy splendor,
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whereby You surround the immense vastness of the stars and
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embrace the aether with Your likeness,
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perhaps Your image appears in the momentary flash
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of lightning with limbs of flowing flames,
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in that You are the Radiance,
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who enlightens all the world beneath You and
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presses onward the sunlight into our days.
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In You are the entire race of Gods.
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You are the invigorating cause of all things.
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You are all of Nature, the One God innumerable.
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You manifest in many way, born once here as a God,
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born once here as a world, this home of Gods and mankind,
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Lucent, majestic source of the starry field in youthful bloom.
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Instill me with Your favoring breath, I pray,
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grant to one willing to know, the manner in which You father the world.
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Grant, Father Iuppiter, that I may come to know the august causes by which
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You once wove all things together to form the physical world of matter,
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and what texture of light,
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congruent and dissimilar,
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You once wove into it,
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by which You animated the world with soul,
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and what it is that is lively,
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by which the quick body lives.
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'''Dive Iove,'''
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'''Omnes Di Immortales quocumque nomine:'''
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'''si quidquam vobis in hac caerimonia displiceat,'''
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'''hoc vino inferio'''
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'''veniam peto'''
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'''et vitium meum expio.'''
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''I offered wine''
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Divine Iuppiter,
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All Gods Immortal, by whichever name:
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if something in this ceremony was unpleasant to you,
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by this wine
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I do apologize
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and expiate my mistake. 
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'''Illicet.'''
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It is done.
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''Ceremony adapted from an ancient prayer to Iuppiter (Tiberianus, Book IV)''
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===PRIVATE RITUS TO THE DIVINE IUPPITER===
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FERIAE IOVI / ID. SEP. 2767 AUC (2014 CE)
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O Father Iuppiter,
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I pray good prayers in order that,
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You may be strengthened by this offering
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of incense (wine/flowers/cakes/all)
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and be favorable
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to me and my family,
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to my family and our household.
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''Offering is made at the household altar.''
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Father Iuppiter, Supreme Ruler of the Universe,
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who does cherish and nurture the human race,
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through whom we live and draw the breath of being,
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in whom rest the hopes and lives of all humankind,
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I pray You grant that on this day,
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the Feriae Iovi and Idus of September,
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may prosper that which I have in hand. 
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Father Iuppiter, as it is prescribed for you in the Sibylline Oracles –
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and for this reason may good fortune attend
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the Nova Roman people, the Quirites,
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me, my family, and my household;
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I beg you and pray that you may
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increase the power and majesty in good times and bad;
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and that you may grant eternal safety, victory and health;
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and that you may protect, keep safe and make greater the state
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of the Nova Roman people, the Quirites,
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me, my family, and my household;
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and that you may accept this sacrifice
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to be offered for you and that
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you may be favorable and propitious
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to the Nova Roman people, the Quirites,
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to me, to my family, to my household;
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Father Iuppiter,
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because it is proper for a cup of wine (incense/flowers/cakes/all)
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to be given to you in the house of my family
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for the sacred feast, for the sake of this thing
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may you be honored by this feast offering. 
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For these reasons be honored with
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the sacrifice of this wine,
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become favourable and propitious
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to the Nova Roman people, the Quirites,
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to me, to my family, to my household.
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''Offering is made at the household altar.''
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Divine Iuppiter,
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and all Gods Immortal
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by whatever name I may call you:
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if anything in this ceremony was displeasing to you,
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with the sacrificial incense (wine/flowers/cakes/all)
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I ask forgiveness and expiate my fault.
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''Offering is made at the household altar.''
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It is done.
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''Ceremony adapted from ancient Roman prayers (Cato De Agricultura, Corpus Inscriptiones Latinae VI 32 323, Acta Sacrorum Saecularium 105-7; and 93-99)''
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==Closing Ceremony==
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L. Vitellis Triarius omnibus salutem plurimam dicit.
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Si valetis, bene est, ego valeo.
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Salvete omnes!
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Today, we come to the end of a special series of events…the oldest in the history of the Roman people…the Ludi Romani.
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As we close, we must remember that in the 2380 years since the founding of these games, they are as important as ever.
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While we do not actually attend plays or race chariots or hear orations, nor visit the temples regularly, we do hold in our hearts and vow to continue the spirit of those that did, and who framed and laid the foundation of the Western World.
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This year, as we also celebrate the bimillenial event of the death of Caesar Augustus, we must not forget that, when the Respublica fell of its own failures and devices, he picked it up, shook off the dust, and reformed and expanded the Roman world.  Many of the things we use on a daily basis are the results of Augustus’ leadership and efforts to reform his world for the betterment of all…then, as well as now.
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In our limited online world, it is my desire that the gods and goddesses of Rome and New Rome were pleased, as well as its citizens.  I hope you have enjoyed these games, and if you did not participate, that’s okay.  Next time Ludi are presented, I invite and encourage you to jump in and have some fun! 
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We all are faced with busy schedules and 10,000 things to do each day.  Many times over the years, I have read posts from new citizens asking, “I just became a new citizen, now what do I do?”  That is an individual choice with multiple answers, but one is, why not participate in the games when they occur?  Participating in the games allows you that much needed break from the routines of our modern world.  Learn to entertain yourself and broaden your knowledge at the same time and put the modern world and its complications on hold for a short break.
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No matter when they occur, be they one day or two weeks, the Ludi are always presented for YOUR pleasure and entertainment.  They are a public, and sometimes private, service and the Respublica’s gift to you. Some are more elaborate than others.  Take advantage of ALL of them every opportunity that you can!
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Who knows, you might catch that disease called…novaromaitis, or New Roman Syndrome!
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Thus, we honor all those who have participated in these games and especially those who achieved the rank of Victor in them:
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''Munera Gladiatoria Victors''
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*'''G. Decius Laterensis, Semi-Finals'''
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*'''Sex. Laelia Macra, Semi-Finals'''
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*'''Sex. Laelia Macra, Finals'''
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''Ludi Circenses Victors''
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*'''M. Cornelius Rutilius, Quarter-Finals'''
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*'''Pub. Annaeus Constantinus Placidus, Quarter-Finals (x2)'''
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*'''M. Pompeius Caninus, Quarter-Finals'''
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*'''Q. Vitellius Triarius, Semi-Finals'''
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*'''G. Decius Laterensis, Semi-Finals'''
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*'''G. Decius Laterensis, Finals'''
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*'''Ti. Vitellia Triaria, Traditional Exhibition'''
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''Cultural Contest Victors''
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*'''Spurius Vibius Calvus, Latin Contest'''
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*'''Aulus Scribonius Nasica, Certamen Historicum'''   
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''Religio Contest Victor''
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*'''L Aelia Corva, Best Lararium Photo'''
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As this is the last of the major games responible to the Aediles curules, it has been a pleasure serving you this year as Curule Aedile and presenting the designated games to you on behalf of the Consuls.  I have had the opportunity to poke fun at some of my friends, and I hope they enjoyed it and did not take offense, for Humor is the one element of life that is required to
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maintain sanity.  It is a shame we don’t use it more often.  It is why Comedy was preferred over Tragedy amongst the ancient Romans…and it should be with us as well.
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There are several other minor festivals coming up this year, as well as the Ludi Plebeii in November, hosted by the Aediles Plebeii.  Participate.  It takes your mind off the stresses of our modern world.  Jump in, be Roman, and have some fun!
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With this announcement, I formally declare the games of the Ludi Romani 2767 a.U.c. closed.
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'''THE GAMES ARE ENDED!'''
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Optime valete omnes,
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L VITELLIVS TRIARIVS
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Aedilis curulis, Senator et Pontifex

Latest revision as of 09:04, 19 September 2014

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Contents

Opening Ceremony

L. Vitellis Triarius omnibus salutem plurimam dicit.

Si valetis, bene est, ego valeo.

Salvete omnes!


Today is the traditional beginning of the oldest games of Rome, the Ludi Romani.

They were held annually starting in 366 BC from September 12 to September 14, later extended to September 5 to September 19. In the last 1st century BC, an extra day was added in honor of the deified Julius Caesar on 4 September. The festival first introduced drama to Rome based on Greek drama.

These games—the chief Roman festival—were in honour of Jupiter, and are said to have been established by Tarquinius Priscus on the occasion of his conquest of the Latin Apiolae, though Dionysius of Halicarnassus and Cicero refer the establishment to the victory over the Latins at Lake Regillus.

At first they lasted only one day. A second day was added on the expulsion of the kings in 509 BC, and a third after the first secession of the plebs in 494 BC. From the year 191 to 171 they lasted ten days, and shortly before Caesar's death they apparently lasted fifteen days, September 5 to 19. After Caesar's death a day was added. This day must have been September 4, because Cicero says that there were 45 days from the Ludi Romani to the Ludi Victoriae Sullanae on October 26, so at the time the Verrines were composed September 19 must have been the last day of the Ludi Romani.

In the calendars during the Augustan era, the days of the games were September 4 to September 19. There was the Epulum Jovis on the 13th, and the Equorum probatio (a cavalry revue) on the 14th. Circus games lasted from the 15th to the 19th. In the Calendar of Philocalus (354 AD) they run September 12 to 15. The celebration was originally organized by the consuls, later of the Curule aediles.

In Nova Roma we have established them annually from September 5th through the 19th.

As we begin our games, we will be focusing on the lesser dieties, as we focused on the major dieties in the Ludi Novi Romani in the Spring. We will also be focusing on Caesar Augustus, since these games fall withing the Ludi Augustales Bimillenarii. A special event will also be held in memory of our dearly departed citizen, Ti. Galerius Paulinus, who recently passed from us.

Today is also the Nones of September. On the Nones in the Sacra privata, we celebrate the dieties of the household. In the Sacra publica no permanent patron deity is recognized on the Nones. This morning I performed a Nones Ritual for the Sacra publica, which can be found below.

Today is also the 2160th Anniversary of the Dedication of the Temple of Iuppiter Stator in Rome. A rededication ceremony follows as well.

With this announcement, I formally declare the games of the Ludi Romani 2767 a.U.c. open.

LET THE GAMES BEGIN!


L VITELLIVS TRIARIVS

Aedilis curulis et Pontifex


Schedule of Events

Day/Date Roman Day Games Events Cultural Events Religio Events Deity Day
FRI Sep 5 Non. Sep Opening Ceremony ' NONES/Temple of Iuppiter Stator Rededication Ianus
SAT Sep 6 a.d. VIII Id. Sep. /// DIES ATER /// /// DIES ATER /// /// DIES ATER /// /// DIES ATER ///
SUN Sep 7 a.d. VII Id. Sep. Augustus Conquest Contest begins Certamen Day 1 Questions Lararium Photo Contest begins Flora
MON Sep 8 a.d. VI Id. Sep. BVBBLENALIA on the Back Alley Musings at the Musarum Contests begin ' Saturnus
TUE Sep 9 a.d. V Id. Sep. Online Naumachia Game Certamen Day 2 Questions ' Fontanus
WED Sep 10 a.d. IV Id. Sep. Online Roman Coin Game Plautus Play Exhibition (English) ' Volturnus
THU Sep 11 a.d. III Id. Sep. Munera Gladiatoria QF Certamen Day 3 Questions ' Pales
FRI Sep 12 prid. Id. Sep. Munera Gladiatoria SF & F Plautus Play Exhibition (Latin) ' Furrina
SAT Sep 13 Id. Sep. FERIAE IOVI BANQUET MENU CONTEST ENTRIES DUE NLT 1200 NOON Rome Time Certamen Day 4 Questions IDUS Ritual & Feriae Iovi Ritual Iuppiter
SUN Sep 14 a.d. XVIII Kal. Oct. /// DIES ATER /// /// DIES ATER /// /// DIES ATER /// /// DIES ATER ///
MON Sep 15 a.d. XVII Kal. Oct. Online Chariot Racing Game Certamen Day 5 Questions ' Carmenta
TUE Sep 16 a.d. XVI Kal. Oct. Ludi circenses QF ' ' Pomona
WED Sep 17 a.d. XV Kal. Oct. Ludi circenses SF & F ' ' Portunus
THU Sep 18 a.d. XIV Kal. Oct. AUGUSTUS CONQUEST CONTEST ENTRIES DUE NLT 1200 NOON Rome Time ALL CULTURAL CONTEST ENTRIES DUE NLT 1200 NOON Rome Time ALL LARARIUM PHOTO CONTEST ENTRIES DUE NLT 1200 NOON Rome Time Quirinus
FRI Sep 19 a.d. XIII Kal. Oct. Closing Ceremony ' ' Augustus


Anniversary of the Temple of Iuppiter Stator

History of the Second Temple to Iuppiter Stator (2nd Century B.C.E.)

Iuppiter Stator, aedes (templum, ἱερόν): a temple vowed, according to tradition (BC 1917, 79‑84), by Romulus at the critical moment in the battle between the Romans and the Sabines when the former had been driven across the forum valley to the porta Mugonia (Liv. I.12.3‑6; ps. Cic. orat. pr. quam in exilium iret 24; Ov. Fast. VI.794; Dionys. II.50; Flor. I.1.13; de vir. ill. 2.8). The epithet stator appears in Greek as ὀρθώσιος (Dionys.) and στήσιος (App. Plut.) This temple was never built, but in 294 B.C. the consul, M. Atilius Regulus, made a similar vow under similar circumstances in a battle with the Samnites, and erected the temple immediately afterwards (Liv. X.36.11, 37.15). Livy explains that no actual building had been put up by Romulus, but fanum tantum, id est locus templo effatus — an attempt to reconcile fact with what had evidently become the popular tradition (Cic. Cat. I.33; ps. Cic. loc. cit.). Its site is variously indicated — in Palatii radice, ps. Cic.; ante Palatini ora iugi, Ov.; ad veterem portam Palatii, Liv.; παρὰ ταῖς καλουμέναις Μουγωνίσι πύλαις, Dionys.; ἐν ἀρχῇ τῆς ἰερᾶς ὁδοῦ πρὸς τὸ Παλάτιον ἀνιόντων, Plut. Cic. 16; cf. Ov. Trist. III.1.32; Liv. I.41.4; Plin. NH XXXIV.29; App. B. C. II.11), and Not. places it in Region IV. It is represented on the relief of the Haterii (Mon. d. Inst. V.7) as hexastyle, of the Corinthian order, and facing the clivus Palatinus.

Cicero called the senate together in this temple (Cic. Cat. II.12; ps. Cic. loc. cit.; Plut. Cic. 16), which was probably not unusual; and in p304it was kept what was evidently a bit of liturgy composed by Livius Andronicus (Liv. XXVII.37.7). The day of dedication is given by Ovid (Fast. VI.793) as 27th January, but this may perhaps be that of a later restoration, and not of Regulus' temple (WR 122‑123). In fact, we learn from Fast. Ant. ap. NS 1921, 111, that either this temple or that in the porticus Metelli was dedicated on 5th September; and, as Hemer. Urb. (cited below) associates that temple with that of Juno Regina, the reference in Fast. Ant. may be taken to be to the temple now under discussion. Two inscriptions of the later empire (CIL VI.434, 435) probably belong to this temple, and it is mentioned in the fourth century (Not.).

Just east of the arch of Titus, a site corresponding with the literary references, are ruins consisting of a large rectangular platform of concrete, on which are some enormous blocks of peperino and travertine (Hermes, 1885, 412). On this foundation the mediaeval turris Cartularia was built (for the explanation of this name, see Rend. dei Lincei 1912, 767‑772; AJA 1913, 569),1 which was not torn down until 1829. This foundation has generally been identified as that of the temple of Iuppiter Stator of the Flavian period (LR 200; HC 250‑252; CR 1905, 75; BC 1903, 18; 1914, 93; 1917, 79‑84; TF 89; DR 178‑182; RE Suppl. IV.480, 481). Some tufa walls, recently excavated close to the north-east side of the arch and beneath its foundations, may have belonged to the temple at an earlier date when its position was slightly different (YW 1908, 23; CR 1909, 61), but the supposition is very doubtful. Others have sought it on the area Palatina, but wrongly (HJ 22).

For a republican inscription on some blocks of tufa there (not on our site), see CIL I21009 = VI.29842 (cf. 36615). It bears the names of two Greek artificers Philocrates and Diocles. See HJ 20‑23; Rosch. II.682‑684.

Iuppiter Stator, aedes (templum, Pliny): a temple which, with that of Iuno Regina and the enclosing Porticus Metelli (q.v.), was built by Q. Caecilius Metellus Macedonicus after his triumph in 146 B.C. (Vell. I.11.3). It is referred to as aedes Iovis Metellina (Fest. 363) and aedes Metelli (Plin. NH XXXVI.40; CIL VI.8708). It was inside the porticus Metelli (Vitr. III.2.5), close to the circus Flaminius (Macrob. III.4.2; Hemer. Urb., CIL I2 p252, 339), and its exact site is known, beneath the church of S. Maria in Campitelli. The temple of Juno was just west of this, on the opposite side of the Via della Tribuna di Campitelli. It is not stated in so many words by Velleius (loc. cit.) that Metellus built both temples, but this is the natural inference from the passage. He is also said to have been the first to build a temple in Rome entirely of marble, and this statement probably applies to both structures. In front of the temples Metellus placed Lysippus' equestrian statues of Alexander's generals, and in them were a number of famous works of art (Fest. 363; Plin. NH XXXVI. 24, 34, 40).

According to Vitruvius (III.2.5) the temple of Jupiter was the work of Hermodorus of Salamis (RE VIII.861‑862), and was an example of a peripteros with six columns across the front and rear and eleven on the sides. The space between the columns was equal to that between the columns and the wall of the cella. As there were no inscriptions on the temples (Vell. loc. cit.) and evidently representations of a lizard and a frog among the decorations (σαύρα, βάτραχος), the legend arose that the architects were two Spartans, Saurus and Batrachus; and further that, as the decorations in the temple of Jupiter belonged to that of Juno, and vice versa, the statues of the deities had been set up in the wrong cellae by the mistake of the workmen (Plin. NH XXXVI.42‑43; RE III.145). The idea that an Ionic capital now in S. Lorenzo fuori le Muraº has anything to do with these temples has generally been abandoned (HJ 539, n87).

After 14 B.C. Augustus either rebuilt the porticus Metelli, or replaced it by the Porticus Octaviae (q.v.), and presumably restored the enclosed temples at the same time. That of Jupiter is mentioned on an undated inscription of the empire (CIL VI.8708: aedituus de aede Iovis porticus Octaviae), and it is included under the rubric Aedes of Region IX in Not. (om. Cur.). The temples are also represented on a fragment (33) of the Marble Plan, that of Juno as hexastyle prostyle, and that of Jupiter as hexastyle and peripteral but with ten columns on a side instead of eleven, as Vitruvius says it had (see above). This discrepancy may perhaps be explained as due to some changes made by Augustus' restoration. Lugli (ZA 229) maintains that, like the porticus Octaviae, they were restored by Severus.

The existing ruins of both temples are concealed for the most part by modern houses in the Via di S. Angelo in Pescheria, and consist chiefly of substructures and walls of travertine and of brickwork, with fragments of marble columns and entablature. Three fluted columns of white marble belonging to the temple of Juno, 12.50 metres in height and 1.25 in diameter, with Corinthian capitals and entablature, are visible in No. 11 of that street. Of the history of these temples after the fourth century, nothing is known (HJ 538‑540; Rosch. II.684‑686. Cf. also Bull. d. Inst. 1861, 241‑245; Ann. d. Inst. 1868, 108‑132).

Reference: Platner, Samuel Ball. “Aedes Jovis Statoris.” A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, pp303‑305. London: Oxford University Press, 1929.


DIES NATALIS AND REDEDICATION RITUAL: 2nd TEMPLE OF IUPPITER STATOR

Performed on the Non. Sep. in Prov. America Transappalachiana St. Cornelia C. Aemilio cos. ‡ MMDCCLXVII a.u.c.

For the 2160th Anniversary of the Original Dedication in Rome

by L Vitellius Triarius Aedilis Curulis et Pontifex


ABLUTIO

I washed both hands in clean water and in capite velato prayed:

May this water cast out all impurities from my substance as from lead to gold. May this water cleanse my body of impurities, as the rain cleanses the air. Purify my mind. Purify my body. Purify my heart. It is so.


PRAEFATIO

Be you well and blessed, O Father Iuppiter Stator, by offering you this incense, I pray good prayers so that you may be benevolent and propitious to me, my family, and my household.

I placed incense in the focus of the altar.


PRECATIO

O Father Iuppiter Stator, on this, the dies natalis of your temple erected in the Eternal City by Q. Caecilius Metellus Macedonicus after his triumph in 146 B.C.E., and restored by Caesar Augustus, I make this offering to you as a rededication of the same. O protector, the stayer, I pray and beseech thee that you may be gracious and favorable to me, my family, and my household, and the Citizens of Nova Roma, for which course I have ordained that the offering of this incense should be made in accordance with my own vows; that you may avert, ward off, and keep afar all disease visible and invisible, all barrenness, waste, misfortune, and ill weather; that you may cause the affairs and business of my household and all Nova Roman households to come to prosperity; that you may provide the Senate and Collegium Pontificum with wise advice and counsel in their daily business, and that you grant health and strength to me, my home and my household, and the citizens of Nova Roma and their homes and households.

I placed incense in the focus of the altar.


REDDITIO

O Father Iuppiter Stator, as by offering to you the incense virtuous prayers were well prayed. For the sake of this be honoured by this humble wine.

A libation of wine is poured on the altar.

It is so.


PIACULUM

O Father Iuppiter Stator, and all Gods Immortal by whatever name I may call you: if anything in this ceremony was displeasing to you, with the sacrificial incense I ask forgiveness and expiate my fault.

Incense is placed in the focus of the altar.

It is done!


Nones Septembris Ritual

Performed on the Non. Sep. in Prov. America Transappalachiana St. Cornelia C. Aemilio cos. ‡ MMDCCLXVII a.u.c.

On the occasion of the Ludi Romani 2767 a.u.c.

by L Vitellius Triarius Aedilis Curulis et Pontifex


ABLUTIO

I washed both hands in clean water and in capite velato prayed:

May this water cast out all impurities from my substance as from lead to gold. May this water cleanse my body of impurities, as the rain cleanses the air. Purify my mind. Purify my body. Purify my heart. It is so.


PRAEFATIO

Be you well and blessed, O Lars familiaris, Penates, Genii of the patres familias, and gods and goddesses of the Nova Roman households on these Nones and festival of the Ludi Romani! By offering you this incense, I pray good prayers so that you may be benevolent and propitious to me, my family, and my household.

I placed incense in the focus of the altar.


PRECATIO

O Lars familiaris, Penates, Genii of the patres familias, and gods and goddesses of the Nova Roman households, on these Nones, with this offering of wine and milk I pray, worship, ask and beseech you so that you may confirm, strengthen and help my family and household and save it from all discord; so that my family and household may always flourish and prosper, and so that you may be benevolent and propitious to me, my family, and my household.

I poured libations of wine and milk on the altar.


REDDITIO

Be thou well, O Lars familiaris, Penates Genii of the patres familias and gods and goddesses of the Nova Roman households! As by offering to you the incense virtuous prayers were well prayed. For the sake of this be honoured by this humble offering of wine and milk, and be benevolent and propitious to me, my family, my household, and to the people of Nova Roma and their families and households. Grant us success in our games and festivities of this, the Ludi Romani.

I poured libations of wine and milk on the altar.

It is so.


PIACULUM

O Lars familiaris, Penates, Genii of the patres familias, gods and goddesses of the Nova Roman households, and all Gods Immortal by whatever name I may call you: if anything in this ceremony was displeasing to you, with the sacrificial incense I ask forgiveness and expiate my fault.

I placed incense in the focus of the altar.

It is done!


Prayer to Furrina

prid. Id. Sep.


Most Ancient One
Goddess of the Etruscans
Ruler of Janiculum Hill
Lady of the Sacred Grove
Guardian of the Forest
Goddess of Springs
Friend of the Nymphs
Mistress of the Flowing Fresh Waters
May You bless us with your beauty,
with your healing waters,
with your nourishing energy.
May good Fortune flow to us as Your
healing waters flow toward the sea.


As performed by

MAN. TITINIVS SILVANVS
Flamen Furrinalis

The Flamen Furrinalis oversees the cult of Furrina, a Goddess of Springs who had a sacred grove associated with water (possibly connected with health and healing). The Flamen Furrinalis leads public rites on the days sacred to Furrina.


CEREMONY TO THE DIVINE IUPPITER

SEP 13, 2014 (2767 AUC)


For the Ludi Romani (Feriae Iovi / Idus Septembris)

St. Cornelia C. Aemilio cos.

Id. Sep.

MMDCCLXVII a.u.c.


Performed by:


L. Vitellius Triarius, Pontifex

Provincia America Transappalachiana

Republic of Nova Roma


Among the ancient Romans, Iuppiter was the supreme god of the Roman pantheon, called dies pater, "shining father". He is a god of light and sky, and protector of the state and its laws. He is a son of Saturn and brother of Neptune and Juno (who is also his wife). The Romans worshipped him especially as Iuppiter Optimus Maximus (all-good, all-powerful). This name refers not only to his rulership over the universe, but also to his function as the god of the state who distributes laws, controls the realm and makes his will known through oracles. His English name is Jove. He had a temple on the Capitoline, together with Juno and Minerva, but he was the most prominent of this Capitoline triad.

His temple was not only the most important sanctuary in Rome; it was also the center of political life. Here official offerings were made, treaties were signed and wars were declared, and the triumphant generals of the Roman army came here to give their thanks. Other titles of Iuppiter include: Caelestis (heavenly), Lucetius (of the light), Totans (thunderer), Fulgurator (of the lightning). As Iuppiter Victor he led the Roman army to victory. Iuppiter is also the protector of the ancient league of Latin cities. His attribute is the lightning bolt and the eagle is both his symbol and his messenger. Iuppiter is completely identical with the Greek Zeus.

September 13th is the Feriae Iovi, or Festival of Iuppiter. It is also the Idus of September, being sacred to Iuppiter. Therefore, on this Feriae Iovis and Idus, I arose early and performed the following public ceremony to Iuppiter Optimus Maximus in my home, and welcome and invite you to perform it in your own home, or at least the private ceremony which follows.


PUBLIC RITUS TO THE DIVINE IUPPITER

FERIAE IOVI / ID. SEP. 2767 AUC (2014 CE)


I washed both hands in clean water and, in capite velato, prayed:

Haec aqua a corpore impuritates velut plumbo ad aurum mutando eluat. Purga mentem. Purga carnem. Purga animum. Ita est!

May this water cast out all impurities from my substance as from lead to gold. Purify my mind. Purify my body. Purify my heart. It is so.

Dive Iove! Dive Iove! Dive Iove!

Divine Iuppiter! Divine Iuppiter! Divine Iuppiter!

Dive Iove, te hoc ture commovendo bonas preces precor, uti sis volens propitius Novis Romanis, amicis meis, mihi, domo, familiae!

I offered incense

Divine Iuppiter, by offering you this incense I pray good prayers so that you be benevolent and propitious to the Nova Romans, to my friends, to me, to my household and to my family.

Dive Iove, ut te ture commovendo bonas preces precatus sum, eiusdem rei ergo macte vino inferio esto!

I offered wine

Divine Iuppiter, as by offering incense I have prayed good prayers, for the very same reason be thou blessed by this wine.

Iuppiter omnipotens, omnia potens, in hac festivitate tibi Ad quem respicit, et admirans ad senem septentriones mirum, notum est, qui semper virtutibus in mille, et ideo nemo umquam vidit Aristoteles aut innumerabiles. Fiat autem si quo dirigantur nomen dignatio vestra, Sancti libenter, nescio, quem tremit fortissimus ipsorum commodo vaga sidera cursus. Tu solus, sed tu ipse in pluribus, Tu in principio, et tu solus, et similiter inter vos, et orta inter sidera ipsa superstes. Finis enim non tibi, ad finem adducere labentibus semper. Celsum, videre ab aeterno in sæculum rotatis quaedam de natura et fatum vitarum accipitur in impeditis et reuoluta a multis retro saeculis, iterum reduci modo firmamento redditi, deducto partium mundi et certe amissa restituit, tura plus semel in Time fluunt. Si sensus ordinare licet cogitare conatum tuum et ad te capere turmis quibus de immensa magnitudine stellarum et coronásti similitudinem tuam amplector, aethera, forte apparet imago tua in praesenti est momentaneum mico cum membra fluentia fulminis ignes, qui es in Caelum, Tu inferno illuminati curvo in lucem dies. Tu genus omne deum In. Confirmatioque omnium causa vos estis. Natura tu es, Domine, Deus infinita. Ut patet in multis ita factum est hic, ut aliquando a Deo hic semel nascitur in mundo in domum Dei et hominum, Lucent, ex regia stellantis in agro flos iuventae faciebat. Tua me immittere spirate quaeso volenti concedimus nosse, in qua pater, modo mundum. Da, pater Iove, augustas ut possim noscere causas, quibus venire Aliquando simul omnia sub forma materiae rebus, et quod lux textura, sed videantur quae de congruentia, Olim in ea pertexuit, qui mundum ab anima: tu, id est, quid sit, et vivam, per quod vivit corpus, est vivos.

I offered wine and incense

Iuppiter Almighty, potent in all things, during this festival to you, to Whom the aged north star looks upon with admiring wonder, the One who is always known by a thousand virtues, no one shall ever be able to account their countless number or timelessness. Now be addressed, if by any name Your dignity may be addressed, Holy One, be delighted, Unknown One, for Whom mightiest Earth trembles and the wandering stars halt their rapid course. You alone, though within Yourself are You many, You are first, and You are last, and likewise are You in between, arising above and outliving the very stars. For without end Yourself, You bring ever-gliding time to an end. On high from eternity You look upon the whirling course of Nature's certain Fate and of lives taken into the intricate convolutions of time immemorial, only to be brought back once more and restored to their heavenly vault, the world no doubt restored of those parts drawn off and will have been lost, only once more for them to ebb back into the flow of unending time. If indeed it is allowed to thoughtlessly direct one's senses toward You and attempt to grasp Your holy splendor, whereby You surround the immense vastness of the stars and embrace the aether with Your likeness, perhaps Your image appears in the momentary flash of lightning with limbs of flowing flames, in that You are the Radiance, who enlightens all the world beneath You and presses onward the sunlight into our days. In You are the entire race of Gods. You are the invigorating cause of all things. You are all of Nature, the One God innumerable. You manifest in many way, born once here as a God, born once here as a world, this home of Gods and mankind, Lucent, majestic source of the starry field in youthful bloom. Instill me with Your favoring breath, I pray, grant to one willing to know, the manner in which You father the world. Grant, Father Iuppiter, that I may come to know the august causes by which You once wove all things together to form the physical world of matter, and what texture of light, congruent and dissimilar, You once wove into it, by which You animated the world with soul, and what it is that is lively, by which the quick body lives.

Dive Iove, Omnes Di Immortales quocumque nomine: si quidquam vobis in hac caerimonia displiceat, hoc vino inferio veniam peto et vitium meum expio.

I offered wine

Divine Iuppiter, All Gods Immortal, by whichever name: if something in this ceremony was unpleasant to you, by this wine I do apologize and expiate my mistake.

Illicet.

It is done.


Ceremony adapted from an ancient prayer to Iuppiter (Tiberianus, Book IV)


PRIVATE RITUS TO THE DIVINE IUPPITER

FERIAE IOVI / ID. SEP. 2767 AUC (2014 CE)

O Father Iuppiter, I pray good prayers in order that, You may be strengthened by this offering of incense (wine/flowers/cakes/all) and be favorable to me and my family, to my family and our household.

Offering is made at the household altar.

Father Iuppiter, Supreme Ruler of the Universe, who does cherish and nurture the human race, through whom we live and draw the breath of being, in whom rest the hopes and lives of all humankind, I pray You grant that on this day, the Feriae Iovi and Idus of September, may prosper that which I have in hand. Father Iuppiter, as it is prescribed for you in the Sibylline Oracles – and for this reason may good fortune attend the Nova Roman people, the Quirites, me, my family, and my household; I beg you and pray that you may increase the power and majesty in good times and bad; and that you may grant eternal safety, victory and health; and that you may protect, keep safe and make greater the state of the Nova Roman people, the Quirites, me, my family, and my household; and that you may accept this sacrifice to be offered for you and that you may be favorable and propitious to the Nova Roman people, the Quirites, to me, to my family, to my household;

Father Iuppiter, because it is proper for a cup of wine (incense/flowers/cakes/all) to be given to you in the house of my family for the sacred feast, for the sake of this thing may you be honored by this feast offering. For these reasons be honored with the sacrifice of this wine, become favourable and propitious to the Nova Roman people, the Quirites, to me, to my family, to my household.

Offering is made at the household altar.

Divine Iuppiter, and all Gods Immortal by whatever name I may call you: if anything in this ceremony was displeasing to you, with the sacrificial incense (wine/flowers/cakes/all) I ask forgiveness and expiate my fault.

Offering is made at the household altar.

It is done.


Ceremony adapted from ancient Roman prayers (Cato De Agricultura, Corpus Inscriptiones Latinae VI 32 323, Acta Sacrorum Saecularium 105-7; and 93-99)


Closing Ceremony

L. Vitellis Triarius omnibus salutem plurimam dicit.

Si valetis, bene est, ego valeo.

Salvete omnes!


Today, we come to the end of a special series of events…the oldest in the history of the Roman people…the Ludi Romani.

As we close, we must remember that in the 2380 years since the founding of these games, they are as important as ever.

While we do not actually attend plays or race chariots or hear orations, nor visit the temples regularly, we do hold in our hearts and vow to continue the spirit of those that did, and who framed and laid the foundation of the Western World.

This year, as we also celebrate the bimillenial event of the death of Caesar Augustus, we must not forget that, when the Respublica fell of its own failures and devices, he picked it up, shook off the dust, and reformed and expanded the Roman world. Many of the things we use on a daily basis are the results of Augustus’ leadership and efforts to reform his world for the betterment of all…then, as well as now.

In our limited online world, it is my desire that the gods and goddesses of Rome and New Rome were pleased, as well as its citizens. I hope you have enjoyed these games, and if you did not participate, that’s okay. Next time Ludi are presented, I invite and encourage you to jump in and have some fun!

We all are faced with busy schedules and 10,000 things to do each day. Many times over the years, I have read posts from new citizens asking, “I just became a new citizen, now what do I do?” That is an individual choice with multiple answers, but one is, why not participate in the games when they occur? Participating in the games allows you that much needed break from the routines of our modern world. Learn to entertain yourself and broaden your knowledge at the same time and put the modern world and its complications on hold for a short break.

No matter when they occur, be they one day or two weeks, the Ludi are always presented for YOUR pleasure and entertainment. They are a public, and sometimes private, service and the Respublica’s gift to you. Some are more elaborate than others. Take advantage of ALL of them every opportunity that you can!

Who knows, you might catch that disease called…novaromaitis, or New Roman Syndrome!

Thus, we honor all those who have participated in these games and especially those who achieved the rank of Victor in them:


Munera Gladiatoria Victors

  • G. Decius Laterensis, Semi-Finals
  • Sex. Laelia Macra, Semi-Finals
  • Sex. Laelia Macra, Finals


Ludi Circenses Victors

  • M. Cornelius Rutilius, Quarter-Finals
  • Pub. Annaeus Constantinus Placidus, Quarter-Finals (x2)
  • M. Pompeius Caninus, Quarter-Finals
  • Q. Vitellius Triarius, Semi-Finals
  • G. Decius Laterensis, Semi-Finals
  • G. Decius Laterensis, Finals
  • Ti. Vitellia Triaria, Traditional Exhibition


Cultural Contest Victors

  • Spurius Vibius Calvus, Latin Contest
  • Aulus Scribonius Nasica, Certamen Historicum


Religio Contest Victor

  • L Aelia Corva, Best Lararium Photo


As this is the last of the major games responible to the Aediles curules, it has been a pleasure serving you this year as Curule Aedile and presenting the designated games to you on behalf of the Consuls. I have had the opportunity to poke fun at some of my friends, and I hope they enjoyed it and did not take offense, for Humor is the one element of life that is required to maintain sanity. It is a shame we don’t use it more often. It is why Comedy was preferred over Tragedy amongst the ancient Romans…and it should be with us as well.

There are several other minor festivals coming up this year, as well as the Ludi Plebeii in November, hosted by the Aediles Plebeii. Participate. It takes your mind off the stresses of our modern world. Jump in, be Roman, and have some fun!

With this announcement, I formally declare the games of the Ludi Romani 2767 a.U.c. closed.


THE GAMES ARE ENDED!


Optime valete omnes,


L VITELLIVS TRIARIVS

Aedilis curulis, Senator et Pontifex

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