Locative

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The locative case is a Latin grammatical case which indicates a location used exclusively for cities and small islands. It corresponds to the English preposition "in".

Here are the basic and very general rules for making a locative case of cities:

  • If a city's name ends in "-us" or "-um", then the locative ends in "-i".
"Corinthus" becomes "Corinthi",
"Mediolanum" becomes "Mediolani".
  • If a city's name ends in "-a", then the locative ends in "-ae".
"Roma" becomes "Romae".
  • If a city's name ends in "-i" or "-ae", then the locative ends in "-is".
"Delphi" becomes "Delphis",
"Athenae" becomes "Athenis".
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