Silvanus

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Silvanus; ancient Italic rustic god of the forests, shepherds, wild places, and boundaries. Although he is assumed to be an ancient deity material on Silvanus only comes from the 2nd century B.C.E. His epithets are ''pater'' and ''senex'' and he was usually depicted as a ragged old man with a sickle. Most scholars reject the identification with Etruscan Selvans but are unsure if Silvanus is an epithet of Mars or a separate deity altogether. Much is unknown about this deity, though he was worshipped throughout the Empire.
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'''Silvanus''' is an ancient Italic rustic god of the forests, shepherds, wild places, and boundaries. Although he is assumed to be an ancient deity, material on Silvanus only comes from the 2nd century B.C.E. His epithets are ''pater'' and ''senex'', and he was usually depicted as a ragged old man with a sickle. Most scholars reject the identification with Etruscan "''Selvans''" but are unsure if Silvanus is an epithet of [[Mars]] or a separate deity altogether. Much is unknown about this deity, though he was worshipped throughout the Empire.
 
[[Image:Silvanus courtesy of Vroma.jpg|right|frame]]
 
[[Image:Silvanus courtesy of Vroma.jpg|right|frame]]
 
   
 
   

Latest revision as of 23:14, 8 February 2014

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Silvanus is an ancient Italic rustic god of the forests, shepherds, wild places, and boundaries. Although he is assumed to be an ancient deity, material on Silvanus only comes from the 2nd century B.C.E. His epithets are pater and senex, and he was usually depicted as a ragged old man with a sickle. Most scholars reject the identification with Etruscan "Selvans" but are unsure if Silvanus is an epithet of Mars or a separate deity altogether. Much is unknown about this deity, though he was worshipped throughout the Empire.

Silvanus courtesy of Vroma.jpg

References

Peter F. Dorcey "The Cult of Silvanus; a study in Roman Folk Religion", Brill 1992

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